ADVICE FOR YOUR CAT

Here you’ll find all the advice you need to keep your cat happy and healthy.

Whether you’re seeking to learn more about pet nutrition and the health of your cat, looking for specific advice, or are new to cat care, we have a wealth of expert advice to guide you. Our vet is constantly updating the content in our advice section, so if you can't find what you're looking for, please come back soon.

Use our advice categories below to narrow your search…

Our Articles

FEATURED

Digestion

Dietary Protein for Dogs and Cats - The Importance of Digestible Proteins

Protein is an important part of your pet’s diet. It is, however, important to understand why your pet requires...

MOST READ

Digestion

What The Pet Food Label Doesn't Tell You - Part 1

In this article we look at the regulation surrounding labelling a pet food “natural” “hypoallergenic” or...

Top

Top 12 Tips

Here are some of our Top Tips to help you keep your feline friend in optimum health.

  1. If you are thinking of changing your pet’s food remember to do it slowly over about 3-4 days. Add the new food to your cat’s old food gradually, increasing the amount of the new food each time you feed your cat. If you change your cat’s food too quickly it’s likely to upset your cat’s tummy.
  2. If you are changing your cat’s food from a low quality pet food that contains sugars, artificial flavourings and digest, to a new healthy cat food, you may find at first your cat is not interested in its new healthy food. Cat’s can get quite addicted to poor quality foods as they like the taste of the sugars and artificial flavourings. If you cat refuses to eat the new healthy food then you may need to slowly change your cat’s food over a period of 6 months so, that her palate adjusts to enjoy the new food. Never take the attitude that your cat will eat the new food when she gets hungry. Cats are not like dogs and they will starve themselves to death if they do not want to eat a food. If your cat stops eating for a prolonged period of time it runs the risk of developing a life threatening condition called hepatic lipidosis, also known as fatty liver disease. So be prepared to transition your cat slowly onto the new food if necessary.
  3. When looking for a quality food for your cat, look for a food that contains digestible proteins rather than simply looking at the crude protein level on the pet food label. Protein is important to your cat because it contains the essential amino acids that your cat must obtain from its food to stay in optimum health. To ensure your cat obtains sufficient quantities of these essential amino acids ensure you feed digestible forms of proteins such as meat and fish from identified meat types.
  4. Some pet foods contain “meat and animal derivatives”, or, “animal by-products”. By law meat and animal derivatives and animal by-products may contain connective tissue, feather, hooves, hides, wool and tails. Whilst these parts of animals may be 100% protein, they are highly indigestible forms of protein and accordingly, your cat may not be able to absorb the required level of amino acids from food containing these ingredients. Avoid feeding your cat a high carbohydrate diet packed with cereals and fillers. Cats are obligate carnivores and their pancreas can only cope with processing very small amounts of carbohydrate. Cats that are fed high carbohydrate dry food diets are more likely to develop diabetes than a cat fed on a low carbohydrate wet food diet.
  5. Avoid feeding your cat a high carbohydrate diet packed with cereals and fillers. Cats are obligate carnivores and their pancreas can only cope with processing very small amounts of carbohydrate. Cats that are fed high carbohydrate dry food diets are more likely to develop diabetes than a cat fed on a low carbohydrate wet food diet. If you feed your cat dry food make sure it’s low in carbohydrate.
  6. As cats are obligate carnivores they usually obtain most of their moisture from their food. Feeding your cat a dry high carbohydrate diet is not what your cat has evolved to eat and can put stress on your cats kidneys, and is considered to be a contributing factor to chronic kidney disease in domestic cats.
  1. If your cat has a sensitive tummy try feeding her a cereal free single meat source diet (see our single source protein foods). It will be easier on your cat’s digestion.
  2. If you have a dog and a cat ensure that your dog’s food does not contain propylene glycol. Propylene glycol is banned in cat food, but not in dog food. It is important that your cat does not eat any of your dog’s food if it contains propylene glycol as it can cause a serious blood disease in cats known as Heinz Body Anaemia.
  3. If your cat’s food has a high ash content it may suggest that there is a lot of ground bone contained in your cat’s food. Whilst ground bone can be digestible, it is 83% collagen and can be very low in the essential amino acids your cat needs to obtain from the protein in her food.
  4. Never feed your cat milk, cats are lactose intolerant.
  5. If your cat has itchy skin, or, a dull coat try adding a high quality fish oil to your cat’s food. The essential omega 3 and 6 fatty acids are good for your cat’s skin and coat.
  6. A good quality Omega 3 fish oils has anti-inflammatory properties that can be of assistance to a cat with arthritis, colitis and inflammatory bowl disease.